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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 1048-1052

Type I spinal arteriovenous fistula with ventral intradural venous drainage: A proposal of a modified classification


1 Department of Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Neurosurgery, King Fahad Medical City, National Neurosciences Institute, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Neurosurgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA
4 Seattle Science Foundation, Seattle, WA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Abdulrahman Y Alturki
Department of Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Department of Neurosurgery, National Neurosciences Institute, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajns.AJNS_100_17

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Objectives: Spinal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the most common spinal vascular lesion and constitutes an abnormal communication between a feeder artery and a draining vein. Arterialization of the venous plexus leads to venous hypertension; consequent edema and congestion of the spinal cord are associated with progressive neurological decline. Patients and Methods: In this report, we describe two unique cases of type I cervical spinal AVF, in which a radiculomeningeal artery forms an intradural fistula that drains into the ventral venous plexus. Results: Both patients underwent surgical obliteration of the fistula with complete occlusion confirmed on postoperative angiography. Conclusion: Both cases do not fit into the current classification scheme. A modified classification is proposed.


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