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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 154-161

Nonvestibular schwannoma tumors in the cerebellopontine angle: A single-surgeon experience


1 P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery and Gammaknife Radiosurgery, P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Basant Kumar Misra
Department of Neurosurgery and Gammaknife Radiosurgery, P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mahim, Mumbai - 400 016, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ajns.AJNS_335_17

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Background: The most common cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor is a vestibular schwannoma. Schwannomas account for 8.5% of all intracranial tumors and more than 90% of the tumors originate from the eighth cranial nerve, but one in five CPA tumors are not vestibular schwannoma. These tumors may have different manifestations and require different management strategies. Methods: We report 224 consecutive NVCPAT operated in the Department of Neurosurgery, P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Mumbai, by the senior author between 2001 and 2014 and discuss the different approaches and outcomes in NVCPAT. Results: The age range was 20–60 years and there were 129 females and 95 male patients. The clinical material consisted of 81 cases of meningioma (36.1%), 44 cases of epidermoid (19.64%), 34 cases of trigeminal schwannoma (15.17%), 26 cases of jugular foramen schwannoma (11.60%), and 39 cases of other tumors (17.41%). In nonvestibular schwannoma (NVS), symptoms and signs from cranial nerve VIII are less frequent and other cranial nerves and cerebellar symptoms and signs predominate. Conclusion: Symptoms and signs are different in NVCPAT from those found in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Hearing loss is not the predominant symptoms. Cerebellar signs and trigeminal dysfunction are more common. The most common approach used in the current series was retrosigmoid craniotomy. Gamma knife radiosurgery was a useful adjunct in a subset of these patients.


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