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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 1: A brain computed tomography of a 54-year-old man presenting with left-sided hemianopsia revealed a subcortical hemorrhage (a). A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed an area of a high-intensity signal in the left cerebellar hemisphere (b). The left posterior inferior cerebellar artery was not depicted on the brain magnetic resonance angiography (c). Computed tomography angiography of the neck showed a tapered occlusion of the left vertebral artery inside the transverse foramen (d, white arrowheads). A contrast-enhanced axial image at the C5 level showed a double-lumen sign (e, black arrow)

Figure 1: A brain computed tomography of a 54-year-old man presenting with left-sided hemianopsia revealed a subcortical hemorrhage (a). A diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging showed an area of a high-intensity signal in the left cerebellar hemisphere (b). The left posterior inferior cerebellar artery was not depicted on the brain magnetic resonance angiography (c). Computed tomography angiography of the neck showed a tapered occlusion of the left vertebral artery inside the transverse foramen (d, white arrowheads). A contrast-enhanced axial image at the C5 level showed a double-lumen sign (e, black arrow)