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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 276-281

Imaging characteristics of supratentorial ependymomas: Study on a large single institutional cohort with histopathological correlation


1 Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Neuropathology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Vani Santosh
Department of Neuropathology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1793-5482.162702

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Background: Supratentorial ependymoma (STE) is a tumor whose unique clinical and imaging characteristics have not been studied. Histopathologically, they resemble ependymoma elsewhere. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings with clinicopathological correlation in a large number of patients with STE to identify these characteristics. Materials and Methods: Computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance images (MRI), pathology reports, and clinical information from 41 patients with pathology-confirmed STE from a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. CT and MRI findings including location, size, signal intensity, hemorrhage, and enhancement pattern were tabulated and described separately in intraventricular and intraparenchymal forms. Results: STE was more common in pediatric age group and intraparenchymal was more common than intraventricular form. The most common presentation was features of raised intracranial tension. There were equal numbers of Grade II and Grade III tumors. The imaging characteristics in adult and pediatric age group were similar. The tumor was large and had both solid and cystic components. Advanced imaging such as diffusion, perfusion, and spectroscopy were suggestive of high-grade tumor. Only differentiating factor between Grade II and Grade III was the presence of calcification. 1234 rule and periwinkle sign which we have described in this article may help characterize this tumor on imaging. Conclusion: This series expands the clinical and imaging spectrum of STE and identifies characteristics that should suggest consideration of this uncommon diagnosis.


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